Saturday 14 March 2020

Second Week of Lent

Word for today
The Gospel of Luke 15:1-3.11-32

Orghìsthe

Verse 28, orghìsthe, literally, he became angry with anger.
There are
two very succulent dishes at  the satanic table, so delicious as to be the most sought after: fear and indignation. Fear of the poor, of sinners, of victims and indignation of the strong, of the powerful, and of those who consider themselves righteous. Evil spirits literally grow fat on their favorite lymph made up of fear and indignation, supplied directly by people's mental circuits when they are transformed into sequences of thoughts and words.  It is that lymph made out of fear and angry indignation that at all times creates stronger and more invincible evil spirits in every corner of the world.
Fear
flows irrepressibly from the mind and the heart of the younger son when, coming to his senses, he realizes that his worn and dismembered illusions are the only true reality that he has left. He feels abandoned and desperate, with his mouth full of disappointment and mud.
Indignation flows irrepressibly, in the name of justice and truth, in the defense of goodness and morality, from the mind and heart of the older son, who thinks he is serving law, duty, and holiness. Anger is violently spat into the Father's face with deep annoyance, condemnation, and rebellion, ultimately leading to an unappealable separation and conflict with the Father Himself.
 Furious indignation springs from the heart and mind of the older son whose hate for his brother and  love for justice lead to an unchallengeable decision and final separation.
Fear is vanquished and erased by the younger son’s last ounce of spiritual strength, by his faith in the Father's mercy, awakened in a moment of awareness that God's love can never abandon his children. The younger son's fear melts into pleas and brings the Father's bowels of mercy to tears, causing tender forgiveness and reconciliation to come about.
The older son’s poisonous anger does not relent and forces the Father to do something amazing, unspeakable and never heard of before: the Father pleads with the older son and implores him not to use that indignation to immerse himself into separation making him renounce the joy and the majesty of love. The text says: his father came out and pleaded with him.
Here there is something absolutely new and never heard of before, something to think long and hard about: God the Father's forgiveness is certain, even more, it is guaranteed, it is regal, joyful, totally revivifying. Moreover, it is certain that the son’s supplication brought God the Father's bowels of mercy to tears, to an embrace, to forgiveness, to joy, and to total reconciliation. But what is uncertain is: can God's incredible and almost rationally unbelievable pleas to his children succeed in moving to love, to compassion, and to joy those outraged, indignant, judgmental minds which continue to judge, rightly or wrongly, and to contemptuously and harassingly condemn their brothers? The Gospel does not tell us.
Between the fear that arises in the hearts of small, weak sinners and the angry indignation of the perfect, there is no doubt that Satan prefers the latter and it is precisely the indignation of those who consider themselves just that is making mankind an unbearable burden for Mother Earth and for the powers of Heaven.